Diverse and #OwnVoices Books

If you’re active in the book community, you may have seen this hashtag kicking around – you may have even read up about it. Especially after the recent outrage from the book community surrounding racist and ableist themes in Veronica Roth’s Carve the Mark. Which is good – because this is an important conversation, and it’s not one that’s going away. In fact, it seems that the discussion surround Carve the Mark spread the call for more diverse, inclusive books to the wider community, and now, more people than ever, are recognizing the need for diverse books.

Book Diversity 2015.jpg

Just look at these statistics (above) – and that’s just in regards to children’s books. The #OwnVoices movement calls upon writers to respect the voices of the characters they write – to not disrespect the diversity in the world around them. We Need More Diverse Books (WNDB) defines diversity as “all diverse experiences, including (but not limited to) LGBTQIA, Native, people of color, gender diversity, people with disabilities*, and ethnic, cultural, and religious minorities.” It asks – can a white, upper-class author really write about the experiences of a minority teen living in poverty? Can a straight author write about the experiences of a LGBTQ2+ youth? And it calls upon the book community to respect #OwnVoices by respecting a diverse community of books, authors and readers, not just the one story of books they know. Respecting diversity in literature is not just a social trend; it’s critical to developing cultural literacy, and to overcoming long-held stereotypes. Susie Rodarme, of BookRiot, sums this up pretty well:

“If you don’t actually know anything about the lives of the people that you’re writing about, though–if you haven’t experienced anything like it in your real life and what you know actually does come mostly from TV and movies–it’s going to come out in cliches and stereotypes when you try to write it.”

And as white, middle-class university student from Canada, do I really have any right to be writing about this? I might not, which is why I’ll keep my judgments on the topic short, but I wanted to make my readers aware of the movement, and I wanted to challenge all of you to make yourselves more aware of the growing diversity in literature, and the need for it.

“So when we call for more diverse stories, I think this diversity must come from diverse authors. It’s not enough to have the same group of primarily white, cis, hetero, able-bodied authors writing more diversely; even with good intentions, they may not get it right. The call for diverse stories comes from groups of people who want to see themselves depicted in stories. That call isn’t answered if we read someone else’s depiction of us and we find that it isn’t true to life” – Susie Rodarme, Book Riot

Books are a type of media – like newspapers, like social media, like the 6 o’clock news, thy perpetuate stereotypes and norms to society, and they dictate our everyday lives, whether we realize it or not.

So the next time you pick up a book, try checking out a #OwnVoices book – I’ve taken the liberty of including some recognized #OwnVoices books below, and I’d love to hear what you think of them, or if you have some that should be added to this list!

And if you’re looking for more information about #Own Voices, please check out WNDB

You can also find my recent post regarding the importance of including diverse books in the classroom on my education blog, titled Miss Vosper.

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